O’NEILL RUNS ONE-TWO AS FORE LEFT WINS $70,000 SUNNY SLOPE STAKES BY A NECK OVER STRONGCONSTITUTION

first_imgO’NEILL RUNS ONE-TWO AS FORE LEFT WINS $70,000 SUNNY SLOPE STAKES BY A NECK OVER STRONGCONSTITUTION; RIDDEN BY GUTIERREZ, HE GETS 6 ½ FURLONGS IN 1:17.54 ARCADIA, Calif. (Oct. 20, 2019)–Reddam Racing’s Fore Left relished a return to sprinting as he rocketed from the gate and was all heart late in holding off stablemate Strongconstitution to take Sunday’s $70,000 Sunny Slope Stakes at Santa Anita.  Ridden by Mario Gutierrez, Fore Left, a Kentucky-bred colt by Twirling Candy, got 6 ½ furlongs in 1:17.54.Seventh, beaten 31 lengths in the Grade I American Pharoah Stakes going 1 1/16 miles here on Sept. 27, Fore Left returned to the form he had demonstrated in his first three starts.“He got back to what he does best today and it was great to see,” said O’Neill, the Autumn Meet’s leading trainer with 18 wins through 14 ½ days of racing.  “I’m really happy with both of my horses, they ran big.  We tried two turns with (Fore Left) last time and this is much more what he’s comfortable with…Really happy.”A winner of the ungraded Tremont Lane Stakes four starts back at Belmont Park on June 7 and a close third three races back in the Grade II Best Pal Stakes going six furlongs at Del Mar on Aug. 10, Fore Left was off at 2-1 in a field of four juvenile colts and paid $6.20 and $3.60 (no show wagering).“Fore Left is named after a good friend of ours who lives in the Bahamas,” said owner J. Paul Reddam.  “It’s after the way he hits the golf ball, meaning, it’s going left.”Out of the Unbridled’s Song mare Simply Sunny, Fore Left, in garnering his second stakes victory, now has three wins from six overall starts.  With the winner’s share of $43,200, he increased his earnings to $199,551.Strongconstitution, who sat third while head and head with 4-5 favorite Mo Hawk into the far turn, was second best, finishing 5 ¼ lengths clear of Zimba Warrior.  Ridden by Martin Garcia, Strongconstitution was off at 5-2 and paid $3.20 to show.Mo Hawk appeared spent a quarter mile out and finished last.Fractions on the race were 22.51, 45.74 and 1:10.64.last_img read more

Black box yet to be sent off for decoding – GCAA head

first_imgFly Jamaica’s crash landing …says no disruption to CJIA’s operations The Boeing 757 aircraft’s black box containing all the information about Fly Jamaica’s Flight OJ256 has been retrieved but is yet to be sent off to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) for investigation, according to the Director General of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA), Colonel (ret’d) Egbert Field.Flight OJ256, destined for Toronto Canada, carrying 118 adults, two infaGCAA Head, Egbert Fieldnts and an 8-member crew, took off from the Cheddi Jagan International Airport at about 02:10h on Friday, but after some time, the aircraft encountered hydraulic problems, and as such returned to Timehri where it crash-landed. The incident has left the passengers and crew traumatized, with five of those passengers sustaining minor injuries.On Saturday, Col Field told Guyana Times that because the incident occurred during the weekend period, things are not moving along as fast as would be desired, hence the reason the black box is yet to be sent off. He added that there are no new developments, as the investigations are still ongoing and are in the preliminary stages.These two pieces of equipment, he added, are important to determine what transpired on the morning of November 9, 2018.Col Field assured that the airport’s operations have not been affected, as flights have been taking off and landing as per normal. He stated that the scene of the crash is still being processed.Meanwhile, Fly Jamaica is yet to issue an official statement about the details surrounding the incident, but did confirm the accident. The Airline have said that they have opened their call centers around the clock, and are contacting passengers with flight reservations through November 14. Arrangements have been made with Caribbean Airlines to have the passengers transported to their destinations.At a press conference on Friday, Public Infrastructure Minister David Patterson explained that a preliminary investigation has been launched into the accident. He nevertheless reiterated that all the passengers and crew are accounted for, while noting the passengers were of various nationalities, including Pakistani, Canadian, American, Trinidadian and Guyanese. Six of the eight crew members are Guyanese, he added. He also noted that a few passengers would have received minor injuries as they were being taken off the aircraft.The accident definitely warrants an investigation, and according to Field, a specialist has been appointed by Minister Patterson to overlook the investigation.Larceny probeMeanwhile, several firefighters were questioned by the Guyana Police Force after they were accused of stealing personal items from the captain and crew members of the beleaguered airline. The theft occurred while the firemen were assisting in the evacuation of the passengers from the aircraft.Fire Chief Marlon Gentle confirmed that some of the stolen items, such as electronic devices, were returned by one of the firemen. In addition, other items were recovered at the Timehri Fire Station. The Police are investigating that incident.In 2016, an incoming Caribbean Airlines Limited (CAL) flight had struck a Fly Jamaica airplane that was parked at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. It was later confirmed that the right wing of the CAL plane had knocked the tail cone of the Fly Jamaica aircraft, which was parked. It was reported that the CAL flight was arriving from New York, while the Fly Jamaica plane was being prepared for boarding.Back in 2011, a Boeing 737–800 aircraft owned by Caribbean Airlines split into two after it veered off the runaway at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. An investigation revealed that “the probable cause of the accident was that the aircraft touched down approximately 4700 feet beyond the runway threshold, some 2700 feet from the end of the runway, as a result of the captain maintaining excess power during the flare and upon touching down, failure to utilise the aircraft’s full deceleration capability resulted in the aircraft overrunning the remaining runway and fracturing the fuselage.”last_img read more

Gor to face Tanzania’s Mbao in Super Cup

first_imgMeanwhile, last year’s finalists Simba SC will tackle Kenya’s AFC Leopards in the late kick off. Simba lost 2-0 to Gor Mahia in last year’s final at the Afraha Stadium in Nakuru.Kariobangi Sharks who are making their second appearance will face Simba’s arch rivals Young Africans while debutants Bandari tackle Singida United in the opening day fixture on December 22.Simba SC defender Hussein Mohammed turns away from with Kariobangi Sharks forward Duke Abuya during their SportPesa Super Cup clash at Afraha Stadium in Nakuru on June 4, 2018. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluSharks were unlucky not to go past the first round last year after losing 3-2 to Simba on penalties having drawn 0-0 in regulation time. Yanga who face them exited the first round after a heavy 3-1 loss against kakamega Homeboyz.Singida on their end lost 2-0 to Gor in the semi finals having beaten AFC Leopards 4-2 in the first round matches.The semi-finals will be played on January 25 while the third-place playoff match will be staged on the final day at 2pm.There might be a repeat of the Gor, Simba rivalry final if both sides go past the first round and semi-finals.The winner of the Gor/Mbao tie will face the winner of the Yanga, Sharks game while the winner of the Bandari Singida fixture plays the winner of the Simba, AFC first round game.AFC Leopards midfielder Whyvonne Isuza vies for the ball with Singida United’s Ally Kenny during their SportPesa Super Cup clash at the Afraha Stadium in Nakuru on June 5, 2018. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluTanzania Football Federation’s competitions manager Salum Madadi said all preparations for the tournament are complete, urging all football fans across the region to turn up in large numbers for the matches which he projects will be exciting and competitive.“This year’s competition is not one to be missed by all the local football fans. We are confident that our teams will perform well and ensure that the tournament cup remains here at home,” said Madadi.“Based on these fixtures we are in for an exciting football week in Dar es Salaam. I urge fans, sports lovers and families to turn up in large numbers at the stadium to support growth of regional football,” said SportPesa’s Chief Marketing officer Kelvin Twissa.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Gor Mahia players celebrate after beating Tanzania’s Simba SC 2-0 in the SportPesa Super Cup final at the Afraha Stadium in Nakuru on June 10, 2018. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNAIROBI, Kenya, Jan 7 – Defending champions Gor Mahia will kick off the defense of their Sportpesa Super Cup against Tanzania’s Mbao FC when this year’s edition goes down at the National Stadium in Dar es Salaam from January 22.Gor will play the Tanzanian debutants on January 23 at 2pm as they look to clinch the title for a third consecutive time and earn the right to play English Premier League side Everton FC again when the Toffees visit East Africa in July.last_img read more

Biden seeks special counsel look into CIA tapes

first_imgOn the presidential campaign trail, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said destruction of the tapes “harms the credibility and the moral standing of America in the world again. There will be skepticism and cynicism all over the world about how we treat prisoners and whether we practice torture or not.” Rival Mike Huckabee, a former Arkansas governor, questioned whether the action was taken for security purposes “or to cover somebody’s rear end.” “If we’re covering somebody’s rear end, we need to expose their rear end and kick their rear end for doing something that’s against the best interest of the United States,” he said. The spy agency’s director, Michael Hayden, told CIA employees Thursday that the recordings were destroyed out of fear the tapes would leak and reveal the identities of interrogators. He said the sessions were videotaped to provide an added layer of legal protection for interrogators using new, harsh methods authorized by President Bush as a way to break down recalcitrant prisoners. Rockefeller said Hayden would appear before his committee Tuesday.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champThat view was not shared fellow Democratic Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who said Congress can get to the bottom of the matter. “I don’t think there’s a need for a special counsel, and I don’t think there’s a need for a special commission,” he said. “It is the job of the intelligence committees to do that.” Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, a member of the committee, echoed that sentiment. The Senate and House intelligence committees are both investigating the destruction of the tapes, and Hagel said one goal is to know whether justice was obstructed and who in the White House might have known about the fate of the tapes. Rockefeller, citing the confidentiality of certain intelligence briefings, said he could not comment on the existence of any other interrogation tapes. WASHINGTON – A Senate Democratic leader said Sunday the attorney general should appoint a special counsel to investigate the CIA’s destruction of videotaped interrogations of two suspected terrorists. Sen. Joe Biden, a Democratic presidential candidate and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, cited Michael Mukasey’s refusal during confirmation hearings in October to describe waterboarding as torture. Mukasey’s Justice Department and the CIA’s internal watchdog announced Saturday they would conduct a joint inquiry into the matter. That review will determine whether a full investigation is warranted. “He’s the same guy who couldn’t decide whether or not waterboarding was torture and he’s going to be doing this investigation,” said Biden, who noted that he voted against making Mukasey the country’s top law enforcer. “I just think it’s clearer and crisper and everyone will know what the truth is … if he appoints a special counsel, steps back from it,” said Biden, D-Del. last_img read more

Poorest minorities lacking access to jobs, good schools

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “Concentrating poverty compounds the effects of just plain poverty,” said Alan Berube, primary author of “Katrina’s Window: Confronting Concentrated Poverty Across America.” Berube’s study focused on extremely disadvantaged neighborhoods where high levels of crime and a lack of quality housing, stable job opportunities, and supportive schools squash the quality of life, and limit the chances that a family might rise above the hardships imposed by their own financial straits. These are areas in which 40 percent or more of residents live below the federal poverty line. The average household earnings in these areas barely exceed $20,000, and four in 10 adults are disconnected from the labor force – unemployed and not looking for work. “We’re underserved, under-respected. … You have to leave your community to get the most basic services,” said Rev. Paul Binion II of Fresno’s Westside Church of God, which serves a largely black community. One result of high-density poverty is its tendency to ensnare the next generation, the study suggested. In these communities, where an average of one in 12 adults have college degrees, children lack the funds, role models and academic footing that would help them get into college themselves. Many of the country’s most disadvantaged minority households are trapped in pockets of concentrated urban poverty that prevent them from accessing the jobs and educations that would allow them to rise above the poverty line. Fresno, Calif., nestled among the country’s highest-grossing agricultural fields, has the nation’s highest concentration of residents isolated in extremely poor neighborhoods, according to a study released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution. New Orleans, second on the list, had its deep racial and economic rifts exposed by Hurricane Katrina. But according to the Census-based research, the deprivation seen in the lower Ninth Ward is closely mirrored by conditions in parts of Louisville, Ky., Miami, and Atlanta, which round out the report’s top five list. Poor planning over decades has concentrated public housing at the core of cities around the nation, while new developments, jobs and schools mushroomed in the suburbs, beyond the reach of low-income households, deepening the divide between the haves and the have-nots, the study said. “It’s access,” said Tate Hill, business development coordinator for Fresno West Coalition for Economic Development. “It’s not that people who live in impoverished areas don’t want to work or don’t want better lives or don’t want their children to go to good schools – they just can’t access it.” Tate’s organization serves an area of 36,000 people that is 49 percent Hispanic, 26 percent black, and 10 percent Asian and doesn’t have a single bank or credit union in the area. The nonprofit offers vocational training, first-home-buyer’s classes, and coaching in basic workplace skills like interviewing. But Tate sees the obstacles to a better life growing even as he works to tear them down. As California’s still affordable Central Valley attracts new residents from the more affluent urban areas to the north and south, housing prices are skyrocketing, he said, and people are being left behind. Fresno is working to overcome these challenges, but its efforts are hampered by a limited tax base, city officials said. “We’re very aggressive in our efforts to produce affordable housing,” said Michael Sigala, Fresno’s housing and community development manager. “There’s just not enough resources when the city doesn’t have a very rich population to start with.” Within the last year, the city committed funding for 250 new units that will be dispersed throughout the city, and available at reduced rents, Sigala said. Smart planning like the mixed-income developments described by Sigala are a key part of the solution, experts said. “Cities are stronger when they’re concentrated and their edges are constrained,” said Carol Whiteside, president of the Great Valley Center, a Modesto-based think tank. “If they’re not, it’s easy to keep moving away from what we don’t like.” Atlanta, fifth on the Brookings Institution’s list, is one of the cities where a concerted effort to dissolve pockets of poverty worked in the past. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s HOPE VI program tore down some of the city’s worst projects and replaced them with mixed-income neighborhoods in the 1990s. But the successful program, created under the first Bush administration and supported by President Clinton, has been hurt by the current president’s budget cuts, Berube said. “For a significant number of families in distressed inner-city neighborhoods, the first step has to be removing the barriers associated with their living environment,” Berube said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TUESDAY Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International rehearses, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Catherine Tedeski at (661) 273-7296. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. FRIDAY Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Emotional Freedom Technique Group offers demonstrations and practices, 6:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends). Self-help tapping technique used to reduce or eliminate stress, cravings, pains, fears, phobias. Call (661) 945-4045. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org.last_img read more

Google Apps Admins: Use APIs Without Writing Code

first_imgklint finley GASI includes a library called, appropriately enough, Google Apps Shell (GAS). GAS can also be called from the command line. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Earlier this week Google released its Google Apps Shell Interface (GASI), an a new way for Google Apps admins to work with the Google Apps APIs without writing code. It also gives users the option to batch execute commands generated from the variables in a CSV file. This will enable admins to automate various tasks from within this interface instead of using third-party tools. Tags:#cloud#Cloud Providers 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market The available commands are documented here. Currently supported commands include:Creating, deleting and modifying usersCreating, deleting and modifying groups Creating Gmail filters, labels, etc.last_img read more

Second coming

first_imgThe spiffy steel, glass and wood facade is like an adornmentArchitect Rajiv Saini is a makeover maverick. His avant-garde designs celebrate heritage structures in an exquisitely modern format, paying tribute to the grand old buildings of yore but in his trend-setting signature style. Mumbai-based Saini has recently refurbished a Victorian style mansion, some 80 years old, located in Hyderabad’s upscale Banjara Hills. And yes, this stately residence in its new avatar has all the grandeur of a vintage space albeit flaunting a chic and contemporary design aesthetic. “We could have started off with a new design. Instead, we decided to work with what we already had and came up with an original space,” he says.Diagonally-framed metal screens in the hand wash areaOpulent living in this erstwhile 7,500 sq ft two-storey residence meant being surrounded by Victorian column embellishments, marble spiral staircases, wrought-iron mermaids and cherubim fountains. But now in its 12,500 sq ft reincarnation, the space sports a clean, modern look highlighted by cutting-edge architectural features and sleek high-end furniture. Undoubtedly, the addition of new space pockets in the existing structure is the edgiest of innovations undertaken by Saini. For design worshippers, supplementing a dwelling with 5,000 sq ft of extra floor space to cope with its changing accommodation dynamics is no mean feat. The living area flaunts an uncluttered lookExplains Saini, who took almost three years to complete this elaborate project, “Extensive structural alterations were carried out to improve the relationships between various spaces.” He holds forth on how wet areas were relocated, a section of the terrace transformed into a gym and the grand spiral staircase replaced with a sleek metal and stone one.Informal dining area with a Poggenpohl pantrySimultaneously, he augmented the existing area by way of new imaginative enclosures. For instance, the terrace gym overlooking the front garden is a newly added cantilevered steel structure, while guestrooms along with a steel and glass study attached to the master suite are all fresh spaces. Also, the dining quarter, created by enclosing a part of the rear garden, is a must-see.The architecture of this elite abode is both sophisticated and quirky. So, a 10-inch gaping hole in the roof caused by the demolition of a 15-ft turret with staircase has taken on a functional role. It is currently a circular skylight enveloping the family room with a sparkling cocoon of light. It’s easy to figure out that this stylish residence has been painstakingly conceptualised and aims to duplicate a high octane hospitality outfit experience. “No fancy hotel anywhere in the world now gives her (my client) as much enjoyment and comfort as her own home,” says an ebullient Saini.Family room with its circular skylight and stylish furnitureSaini has a fine eye for decor details. The spiffy steel, glass and wood faade is almost like an adornment while the honeycombed structure of the living and dining areas reflects the refined sensibilities of the architect.The glamorous interiors are outfitted with sumptuous furniture like B&B Italia sofas. Highlights of the dining room include a custom-designed table in lacquered metal and glass, faceted mirrored ceiling concealing lighting recesses and an exposed concrete wall at the far end.A red Cappellini rocking chair in one of the roomsEqually impressive is the hand wash area. Making a chic statement here are diagonally-framed metal screens accessorised with marigold flowers. Another attractive feature is the metal and stone diagonal staircase hemmed in by the living and dining spaces. But the piece de resistance is a glass bridge on the first floor which connects the gym as well as guest suites to the main premise.The architect’s love for texture comes across through a mindboggling variety of materials used. There’s a row of yellow travertine bookshelves lining a single wall of the guest suite. The TV lounge too is dominated by acoustically treated leather-clad walls while a delicate relief work etched on white marble forms the wall behind the television.Indeed Saini’s work is contemporary, has a cultural context to it but with an unexpected modern twist. And as the experimental architect puts it aptly, “No one could believe it was the same structure that stood there since the ’80s.”advertisementlast_img read more

Nostalgia hits in PBA Legends charity event

first_imgLATEST STORIES ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Racela also rekindled his longtime rivalry with Alaska legend Johnny Abarrientos.“We were rivals ever since high school then, college and the PBA. We were on the same draft and we retired the same year,” said Racela.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Worth the wait: UST rookie Eya Laure dazzles in collegiate debut SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town MOST READ “It was goosebumps. It brings back memories,” said Allan Caidic, who played for San Miguel Beer from 1993 to 1998, after leading the Beermen over Alaska in the curtain raiser of the PBA Legends: Return of the Rivals even Sunday night. “We used to play Alaska during the mid-1990s. We were rivals.”“It was like everything came back. We went back to the 90s. Everyone enjoyed. All four teams, the crowd,” said another San Miguel great Olsen Racela, who played for the Beermen from 1997 to 2011.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesCaidic and Racela helped the Beermen come away with a 96-83 win in a highly-entertaining and competitive charity game where the real winner were the fans and the PBA Foundation.“But more than that, more importantly, we were able to help past PBA players who are in need,” the 48-year-old Racela, who now serves as head coach of Far Eastern University and assistant of Barangay Ginebra. Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations PBA IMAGESNostalgia was in the air as early as the pre-game introductions.The fans, who filled the historic Araneta Coliseum to the rafters, felt the glorious memories come back and so did the players themselves.ADVERTISEMENT Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants View comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woeslast_img read more

THOUSANDS OF MOTORCYCLISTS ROLL TOWARDS STURGIS

first_imgThousands of motorcycles are heading to South Dakota for the 78th Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in the Black Hills.Governor Dennis Daugaard says the annual event brings an economic boost to the state:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/STURGIS.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC…………state too. ;22Daugaard says the state has mobilized several resources to help the cyclists attending Sturgis:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/STURGIS2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………and collections. ;28Riders can visit SouthDakotaRides.com for real-time information and links to weather updates, roads information and a map of hospital, urgent care and police station locations.last_img read more